Two Autograph Letters Signed, one in English and Yiddish, 4pp on folded 8vo sheet, June 7, 1942; and one in Yiddish, 4pp on one large 8vo sheet, Great Neck, NY, March 31, 1943. MAX WEBER.
Two Autograph Letters Signed, one in English and Yiddish, 4pp on folded 8vo sheet, June 7, 1942; and one in Yiddish, 4pp on one large 8vo sheet, Great Neck, NY, March 31, 1943.
MAX WEBER

(1881-1961) Russian-born American painter who worked in the style of cubism before migrating to Jewish themes towards the end of his life.

Two Autograph Letters Signed, one in English and Yiddish, 4pp on folded 8vo sheet, June 7, 1942; and one in Yiddish, 4pp on one large 8vo sheet, Great Neck, NY, March 31, 1943.

In both war-time letters to his cousin, Charles Getz, Weber writes mostly of support for Russia against the Nazis but he also discusses his art. In the letter dated 1942, Weber offers Charles congratulations on his marriage. Weber comments on his cousin no longer being lonely. "One can read the greatest books... but reading is not living. Life without human (and (social) [sic] contact is pretty barren." Weber continues by commenting on an "excellent appreciation of my work in the ‘Morning Freiheit’ by Dr. Kloomok... his is one of the best Jewish writers...." Dr. Isaac Kloomok was a scholar who wrote about Jewish artists, including Weber and Marc Chagall. Weber writes of current events. "At the moment the news from Russia is not so very good, and you know how grieved I am, but in the end the Nazi bastards will be conquered and sent to hell for all time!....” He continues in English until the last paragraph which he writes in Yiddish. “I would like to apologize for not writing in Yiddish, it takes too long…I was in Chicago but after my lecture in the museum my whole time was take up by receptions….” He signs, "Max – Motel," and continues in Yiddish. “They are talking about a second front while Hitler has opened four fronts. How long can Soviet Russia keep on fighting 90% of this war?" In the second letter written almost a year later and fully in Yiddish Weber apologizes for not writing for some time saying that he had to prepare for two exhibitions, "one in New York [possibly the 1942 Paul Rosenberg & Co. gallery exhibition], and the other, for The Carnegie Institute, museum of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania [the Carnegie Institute exhibition took place in 1943]." He says that the other reason for not writing was because he was in a bad mood as his son "Meinard was drafted on the 29th January; he had to interrupt his studies in college." Weber then opens up to his cousin about how he feels, specifically about current world problems. "I got used to the thought of the terrible war lead by the ‘Capitalist locust’... You are... a more decent human being than the millions of professional ‘Intellectuals’. A person can be very learned, and despite his knowledge be a moron, with lack of insight about himself, who becomes an enemy of himself and an enemy of other people... my heart aches about the fact we witness that after the accomplishment of the Soviet Union to rescue the world from the Nazi snake, she is being criticized and made fun of by her own allies... Now... a trial of two labor leaders in Poland. It’s unbelievable how the God of the capitalists provides them with material, accusing them the same way as the previous traitors did at the last trial." He continues in this vein, upset at the “capitalists” and closes by saying that his son, Meinard, is a colonel in the Chemical Impregnating Division of the army. He signs, "Max – Mordecai."

Item #2599

Price: $1,350.00

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