Autograph Letter Signed, 2pp on one sheet of "Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute" stationery, 4to, Tuskegee, Jan. 28, 1931. GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

(1864-1943) American botanical researcher and agronomy educator recognized for plant disease research and reviving the peanut industry.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2pp on one sheet of "Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute" stationery, 4to, Tuskegee, Jan. 28, 1931

Carver discusses his investigations into peanut diseases and specific experiments in growing healthy plants. He writes to Grady Porter, a researcher from a peanut processing plant in Columbus, Georgia. Carver thinks they will be able to produce, "the perfect form from the last bag of vines you brought. I have put them out in the open air where they can mature in a natural way. The perithecia are well developed..." He notes that he found, "some imperfect ascispores, " but writes that, "within a few weeks I will find perfectly developed spores. I am trying to develop the hearts...." He then suggests that a "bacterial disease" may be affecting growth. "These may be related to a disease on cotton stalks which I am going to investigate...I found three small pieces of cow pea vines in with the peanut vines you brought...the peanut and cow pea vine have the same trouble...." Carver asks Porter to look for cow pea vines "with little pustules" like the ones on peanut vines. He ends the letter using the scientific names for the plants to explain what Grady should look for. He signs, "G. W. Carver." With holograph envelope of Tuskegee Institute.

Carver had achieved widespread recognition by the time he wrote this letter. He was credited for developing peanut products and bringing back the peanut industry which had been devastated by disease from insect infestation at the end of the nineteenth century. Carver also promoted interracial cooperation.

Item #4135

Price: $1,850.00