Rare War time Autograph Letter Signed to Martha Gellhorn, 6 separate 8vo pp of tan graph paper, August 6, 1944. This letter is one of a handful of surviving Hemingway letters to Gellhorn. According to her son Sandy Gellhorn, some months before her death in 1998, Martha burned most of her correspondence files, including her letters from Hemingway. Sandy was able to interrupt the process, saving this letter from destruction. ERNEST M. HEMINGWAY.
Rare War time Autograph Letter Signed to Martha Gellhorn, 6 separate 8vo pp of tan graph paper, August 6, 1944. This letter is one of a handful of surviving Hemingway letters to Gellhorn. According to her son Sandy Gellhorn, some months before her death in 1998, Martha burned most of her correspondence files, including her letters from Hemingway. Sandy was able to interrupt the process, saving this letter from destruction.
ERNEST M. HEMINGWAY

(1899-1961). American writer, awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1954. He is best remembered for novels including, “The Sun Also Rises,” “A Farewell to Arms,” and “The Old Man and the Sea” for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1953. He belonged to the 1920s American ex-patriot community in Paris and was a World War I veteran.

Rare War time Autograph Letter Signed to Martha Gellhorn, 6 separate 8vo pp of tan graph paper, August 6, 1944. This letter is one of a handful of surviving Hemingway letters to Gellhorn. According to her son Sandy Gellhorn, some months before her death in 1998, Martha burned most of her correspondence files, including her letters from Hemingway. Sandy was able to interrupt the process, saving this letter from destruction.

Hemingway writes to Martha Gellhorn who was stationed at the time as a war correspondent with the Allied forces in Normandy but was on assignment in Italy. Hemingway was at Mont. St. MIchel recuperating from injuries in a jeep accident caused by a German shell. In part, "Am so glad you are happy and having a fine time and getting some sun. Am sure you will get good stories too and anyway living and being happy is better than stories. Please take everything I say straight and do not read in hidden meanings nor insults...Hung around with some flying pals a while then hooked up with an Infantry division... We took 6 SS Panzer bastard prisoner Aug. 2 -- You may have seen something about it in Aug 5 Stars and Striped...Day before yest while in advance of infantry I got knocked down by a tank shell. enemy tank then fired on us and on me playing dead by road with machine gun. threw dirt all over head and cut leaves from hedge all over helmet. They also had at least 2 machine pistols in cross fire on each side of road. Two Germans crawled up to hedge and could hear them talking. Was quite a time...If we had not run into that place first they would have killed many people. Am very good at imitating a dead [man] under such circumstances...Think instead of piece will write short stories of life in [the infantry] Division. Have good ones and will write them and cable them...The stuff is too wonderful to write as journalism...So I will just write the stories as well as I can. Please do not think I have been being a crazy. Have been working very close to the bull but everything have done has been useful...I am going to stay with it [the Division]. I don't care about being the first into any place nor about 'the story'. Would rather be with those who do the fighting in some useful capacity and then go home finally and write book & be buried in a good country like France which I have always loved very much anyway and see and love better than ever did before. Only hope I can write as well about it as I should...." He signs, "E. Hemingway, War Correspondent." Very Good.

Hemingway was a war correspondent for “Colliers” and was embedded with the US 4th Division that landed on the Normandy beaches on June 6, 1944. He stayed with the division as they marched into Paris to liberate it from the Germans on August 25, 1944. As mentioned in this letter that if he had to die, he would want to be “buried in a good country like France which I have always loved very much anyway….” This letter was written toward the end of Gellhorn and Hemingway’s marriage. Hemingway had already met his fourth wife, Mary Welsh. Hemingway mentions some friends in this letter. Buddy North (Henry W.R. “Buddy” North) was one of the owners of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. According to “Dear Papa, Dear Hotch: The Correspondence of Ernest Hemingway and A. E. Hotchner,” Buddy and Hemingway “caroused together in London during World War II….”  Hemingway says that Buddy North is “somewhere around but have not seen him.” Capa is Robert Capa, the war photographer and photojournalist who was the only photojournalist at the landing at Omaha Beach on D-Day. He, too, worked for “Colliers” and then for “Life” magazine. He was a good friend of Hemingway and Gellhorn whom Hemingway met during the Spanish Civil War.  A Youtube video from “atelierdesarchives.com” shows footage of Hemingway and Capa on Mont St. Michel in August of 1944 and in this letter Hemingway states, “Capa is here now.”.

Item #4344

Price: $20,000.00

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